Honoring God's call to both work and family life
 
 
 

Promoting good work so that all families flourish. 

 
 
 
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Valuing Families

The Christian tradition sees both family life and work as two God-given spheres of human responsibility. Yet many parents experience work and family life as sources of constant conflict.

What would it look like for work and family spheres to complement, rather than compete with, each other?

 
 

Time to Care Story Series Explores Family and the Pressures of Time

We all know what it is like to wish for more time - more time before an approaching midnight deadline, before kids ask for dinner, before "goodbye." But not everyone has access to the time they need to fulfill God's calling for their families.

Time to Care is a new series featuring the voices of families. Through vulnerable conversation and reflection, Time to Care will consider how the sphere of work has encroached on the family, and help us collectively discern what justice requires to ensure all families have the freedom to flourish.

This series will debut in November and is in partnership with Shared Justice, an initiative of the Center for Public Justice that that provides content and events for millennials at the intersection of faith and politics.

 
 
 

Join us in advancing policies that honor God’s call to both work and family life.

Families Valued is an initiative of the Center for Public Justice, a civic education and public policy organization that works to equip citizens, develop leaders and shape policy to serve God, advance justice and transform public life.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Ensuring that families have time to care

The family is the most basic human institution. We recognize its inherent God-given value, as well as its value to a healthy society.

 
 
 
 
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Report: Time to Flourish

BY KATELYN BEATY AND RACHEL ANDERSON

This report from Families Valued and the Center for Public Justice explores the topic of time as it relates to family life and family stress.

Our focus on time is not to neglect the many conditions that foster family well-being, but to encourage sustained consideration of the particular condition of family time.

Greater attention to family time may help us understand and mitigate the complex stresses and fragmentation affecting too many American families. For pro-family Christians who are committed to family flourishing, family time-stress is worth close scrutiny.